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Maura Judkis

Reporter, The Washington Post

Washington, D.C.

Maura Judkis

Maura Judkis is a reporter for the Washington Post, covering culture, food and the arts. Her work has been honored by the Association of Food Journalists and the Virginia Press Association. Maura has appeared on local and international TV and radio, including MSNBC, CNN, PBS, and Al Jazeera. She is a 2007 graduate of the George Washington University, and a 2011 arts journalism fellow with the National Endowment for the Arts and the University of Southern California.

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I used every pumpkin spice product I could find for a week. Now my armpits smell like nutmeg.

Pumpkin spice is not a flavor, it’s a lifestyle. Its mantra is the crackle of fallen leaves and bonfires. “Sweater weather” is its holy creed. The pumpkin spice life, like its coffee, is sweet, and you are always #thankful for your #blessings. It was never really about that particular blend of cinnamon, clove, nutmeg, ginger and allspice, but how it makes us feel: warm, nostalgic, loved.
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I have looked into Starbucks’s new Crystal Ball Frappuccino, and the future looks bleak

After the unicorn, mermaid, zombie, vampire and dragon Frappuccinos, Starbucks has apparently run through the entire list of magical creatures that can be coated in sugar and blended with ice. So this weekend, it’s hoping for a different type of magic: The Crystal Ball Frappuccino, in stores through March 26, is the brand’s newest Instagrammable rainbow concoction.
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Thanks to Jane Walker, ladies can finally drink scotch

Johnnie Walker is rolling out a female version of its iconic logo, an attempt to draw more women to the world’s best-selling scotch and acknowledge a broader push toward gender equality. A limited U.S. edition of the whisky will have a striding woman on the label — rather than the traditional top-hatted man — and carry the name Jane Walker.
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Doritos is developing lady-friendly chips because you should never hear a woman crunch

PepsiCo chief executive Indra Nooyi told the Freakonomics podcast on Jan. 31 that Doritos, which is owned by PepsiCo, is developing a chip for women. They don’t like to crunch too loudly in public,” she said. The company’s future chip for women will be “low-crunch, the full taste profile, not have so much of the flavor stick on the fingers, and how can you put it in a purse?
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Why ‘Mean Girls’ fandom runs so deep

Are you a late 20- to early-30-something excited to see “Mean Girls: The Musical?”. (Is butter a carb? The answer to both questions: Yes.) Get in, loser, we’re going to the theater. The show’s tryout run at the National Theatre began previews Tuesday, and it has its formal opening night Nov. 19 .
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Forget the handmade wreaths. Now Martha Stewart hangs with Snoop Dogg and makes weed jokes.

Here are some of the things Martha Stewart has done on her new show with Snoop Dogg: She has worn a blinged-out cheese grater on a chain around her neck. She has drunk out of what can only be described as a pimp cup. She has taste-tested a stoner recipe for a pizza omelet. She has name-dropped Escoffier.
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I tried a microwaveable mug cake for one and fell into a deep abyss of despair

Here it is, one of the saddest phrases in the English language: “Duncan Hines microwaveable mug cakes for one.”. It plunges you deeper into darkness with each word, until the final salvo. Microwaveable mug cakes for one are a memento mori with rainbow sprinkles. [I used every pumpkin spice product I could find for a week.
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Blue wine is now a thing because your Instagram doesn’t have taste buds. (Un) Fortunately, we do.

We asked a group of Washington Post colleagues to taste a variety of wines to see if they could identify blue wine. This is what they tasted. Americans went crazy for rainbow bagels and Unicorn Frappuccinos and millennial pink tequila. And given how quickly we flock to the newest hyperpigmented trendy food item — snapping trophy photos for social media, of course — the makers of Gik must be pretty certain they have a hit on their hands.
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Starbucks’ Unicorn Frappuccino tastes like sour birthday cake and shame

Most people think of unicorns as cuddly-cute magical rainbow sparkle horses, right? Except according to ancient lore, the mythical creature was “the fiercest animal, and it is said that it is impossible to capture one alive,” Pliny wrote. “Its cry is a deep bellow.”. A deep bellow was the noise heard across America when Starbucks released its long-rumored Unicorn Frappuccino in participating stores nationwide Wednesday.
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About

Maura Judkis

Maura Judkis is a reporter for the Washington Post, covering culture, food and the arts. Her work has been honored by the Association of Food Journalists and the Virginia Press Association. Maura has appeared on local and international TV and radio, including MSNBC, CNN, PBS, and Al Jazeera. She is a 2007 graduate of the George Washington University, and a 2011 arts journalism fellow with the National Endowment for the Arts and the University of Southern California. She has also written for U.S. News & World Report, TBD.com, ARTnews, the Washington City Paper, and the Onion A.V. Club.