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Maura Judkis

Reporter, The Washington Post

Washington, D.C.

Maura Judkis

Maura Judkis is a reporter for the Washington Post, covering culture, food and the arts. She is a 2018 James Beard Award winner whose work has been recognized by the Association of Food Journalists and the Virginia Press Association. Maura has appeared on MSNBC, CNN, PBS, NPR and Al Jazeera. She is a 2007 graduate of the George Washington University, and a 2011 arts journalism fellow with the National Endowment for the Arts and the University of Southern California.

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‘I want to see you naked’: When alcohol flowed, Mario Batali turned abusive, workers say

The theme of the party was Magic, Martinis and Mario, and there was an awful lot of the latter two. It was at Mario Batali’s buzzy Los Angeles restaurant Osteria Mozza, the week of the Oscars in March 2010. Vanity Fair publisher Edward Menicheschi was hosting a private dinner for advertisers, and the restaurateur and chef was the main attraction.
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Miss World is the biggest beauty pageant you’ve never heard of. What’s it doing in Washington?

There is no swimsuit competition at Miss World. Miss Universe, sure: More body than brains. But Miss World? She’s all about charity and humanitarianism and talent. Let alone that the global pageant — which is considered more prestigious than Miss Universe — is happening right now, on the Maryland fringe of the nation’s capital, with a crowning Sunday at the new MGM National Harbor casino.
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This ‘burger pervert’ turned a fetish into a following. Now, can he make it last?

The day Mathew Ramsey went viral was nearly his last. It was March 8, 2014, and traffic to his over-the-top blog, PornBurger, had just gone through the roof after a mention on the technology website Gizmodo.com. And as he was sitting at his kitchen table, watching it all happen, he took a bite of a ham sandwich and began to choke.
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The Renwick is suddenly Instagram famous. But what about the art?

The exhibition is about amazement, marvel and awe. But as droves of Renwick Gallery visitors gape at the large-scale installation art in “Wonder,” the newly reopened museum’s inaugural show, curator-in-charge Nicholas Bell is more amazed by something else: their phones. Thanks to a few well-placed signs announcing “Photography Encouraged,” smartphones are omnipresent when you walk into the Renwick.
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Is posting support for Paris on Facebook narcissistic, or heartfelt?

We were in Paris, more than a mile from the attacks, enjoying a quiet Friday night dinner at an Alsatian restaurant, just as people on vacation do. Our first indication that something bad had happened wasn’t the sound of gunfire or explosions, but the buzz of a text from a family member back home: “Are you ok?”.
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Inside the Puppy Bowl, the visionary force behind online cute

NEW YORK - When reporters from the New Yorker, "NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams," "Good Morning America," the Associated Press and, yes, The Washington Post have all convened upon one event, it must be important. An appearance by the president. A press conference about dignified matters, with plenty of throat-clearing and questions taken at the end.
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Fashion Week: If you weren't photographed, were you really there?

If you go to Fashion Week and no one takes your picture, were you ever really there? This is the existential question that hovers over the periphery of Fashion Week, where there are no front-row seats, backstage passes or gift bags of expensive designer goodies.
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He’s ready for his ‘Top Chef’ spotlight. And he wants to use it to talk about African food.

Participate in a thought experiment for a second: What if your life were as good as Eric Adjepong’s? You’d be a chef who was plucked for the latest season of “Top Chef,” potentially on the verge of becoming famous. You’d have a catering business and the confidence that, after a national platform like the Bravo show, investors and a restaurant were sure to follow.
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My family knew Mister Rogers. And yes, he was like that in real life.

Whenever I tell people that my dad worked for Mister Rogers and that I met the children’s TV star when I was young, they always ask the same question: “Was he really like that in person?”. By “like that,” they mean the qualities that we associate with Mister Rogers: gentleness, patience, wisdom, and empathy.
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Two new shows skewer trendy food culture — through the eyes of a black ex-con and a young white server

Early on in two new fish-out-of-water shows, there are parallel scenes in which a main character, newly arrived in Brooklyn with little professional experience but a lot of hope, interviews for a job at a restaurant. In “The Last O.G.,” a comedy on TBS, our job-seeker is Tray (Tracy Morgan), a former drug dealer who has returned to his newly gentrified neighborhood after 15 years in prison, looking to change his life and put to use the culinary skills he learned while locked up.
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The five best Super Bowl commercials, from Tide to Tide

This year’s Super Bowl commercials largely took a break from politics and offered up silly humor instead. Celebrity cameos ranging from rapper Cardi B to actor Chris Hemsworth brought out the best in the spots. We saw a few of them coming — Amazon and Doritos, for instance, released their ads online earlier — but others, such as David Harbour’s many Tide ads, took us by surprise.
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Why ‘Mean Girls’ fandom runs so deep

Are you a late 20- to early-30-something excited to see “Mean Girls: The Musical?”. (Is butter a carb? The answer to both questions: Yes.) Get in, loser, we’re going to the theater. The show’s tryout run at the National Theatre began previews Tuesday, and it has its formal opening night Nov. 19 .
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About

Maura Judkis

Maura Judkis is a reporter for the Washington Post, covering culture, food and the arts. She is a 2018 James Beard Award winner whose work has been honored by the Association of Food Journalists and the Virginia Press Association. Maura has appeared on local and international TV and radio, including MSNBC, CNN, PBS, and Al Jazeera. She is a 2007 graduate of the George Washington University, and a 2011 arts journalism fellow with the National Endowment for the Arts and the University of Southern California. She has also written for U.S. News & World Report, TBD.com, ARTnews, the Washington City Paper, and the Onion A.V. Club.