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Maura Judkis

Reporter, The Washington Post

Washington, D.C.

Maura Judkis

Maura Judkis is a reporter for the Washington Post, covering culture, food and the arts. Her work has been honored by the Association of Food Journalists and the Virginia Press Association. Maura has appeared on local and international TV and radio, including MSNBC, CNN, PBS, and Al Jazeera. She is a 2007 graduate of the George Washington University, and a 2011 arts journalism fellow with the National Endowment for the Arts and the University of Southern California.

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Can smart kitchen devices actually make you a better cook?

In the kitchen of the future, it was time to make some salmon, and the reporter of the present day — that’s me — had several choices. I could put it in my smart pan, which would notify me via cellphone alert when it had reached the precise temperature — 375 degrees Fahrenheit — at which the fish should be cooked, and when to put it in the pan, and when to flip it, too.
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Sous vide is couture convenience food. Is this the year home cooks finally embrace it?

To help the harried cook, there have long been promises of dinner at the touch of a button. But a San Francisco start-up has gone one step further: It has eliminated the button. With a device that debuts next month, the contents and precise cooking directions of a pouch of food — tagged with radio frequency identification — can be determined with a mere pass in front of its small screen.
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A robot named Bruno helped make your pizza. Is it still ‘artisanal’?

When robots inevitably take over our planet, as the dystopian vision of science fiction writers foretells, we’ll lose our jobs, our freedom, our humanity. But take comfort in one thing the robots will provide for us lowly carbon-based life-forms: artisanal pizza. They’re already making it in a commercial kitchen in the heart of Silicon Valley: Two robots named Pepe and Giorgio squirt sauce on dough, and another robot, Marta, spreads it.
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‘Recipes are dead’: What the future of cooking might look like

There will be no more cookbooks from chef Tyler Florence. Sure, you’ve welcomed him into your home through his books “Tyler Florence Fresh” and “Dinner at My Place,” and his Food Network shows like “Tyler’s Ultimate.”. But he will not print any more recipes. Why bother? “I’ll publish a cookbook and I’ll have 125 recipes.
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The meal-kit industry is at a crossroads. Will it ever figure out what we really want?

It was going so well for Blue Apron, until it wasn’t. The company, which set nationwide trends with its mail-order subscription meal kits, delivering ingredients and instructions to hundreds of thousands of Americans, had valued itself at $3.2 billion weeks before its initial public offering. But a few days before Blue Apron shares entered the market on June 29, Amazon.com announced that it intended to buy Whole Foods.
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This shipping-container farm could someday solve the food desert problem

There’s a farm opening soon in Laurel, Md., that can grow strawberries in January. It could grow rare tropical fruits from Asia and Central America on our native soil. It could produce custom-designed lettuce, more peppery or sweet. It’s a hydroponic farm in a shipping container, and its owners hope it could eventually put an end to food deserts, including our biggest one: outer space.
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Alice Waters wants Amazon’s Jeff Bezos to ‘make a difference’ with Whole Foods

Amazon’s announcement that it intended to purchase Whole Foods rocked the food industry on Friday. Ever since, people have been trying to predict the future. What will it mean for other delivery services? For other grocery stores? For farmers and suppliers? For the way we live? One of the industry’s strongest voices has some thoughts about that.
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Drone-delivered kale, and 5 more things we might see at an Amazon-owned Whole Foods

Retail giant Amazon.com announced on Friday morning that it plans to buy your favorite place to buy asparagus water, Whole Foods Market, for $13.7 billion. The move stands to solve a huge problem for Amazon: the “last mile,” which is shorthand for the idea that, the closer you get to a product’s final destination, the more challenges you have in delivering it.
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How smart are they? 10 new-wave countertop appliances, tested

It won’t be long before all of our kitchen gadgets are tethered to our phones via WiFi or Bluetooth. The Post tried 10 smart countertop appliances to see how they would fit into a normal kitchen routine. Here’s what we thought of them. June oven ($1,495). A WiFi-connected convection oven with image-recognition technology and a built-in scale on top.
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The next time you order food, this cute robot might roll up to deliver it.

When they first see a little robot moving down the sidewalks of Washington, people ask the same question: “Can it bring me beer?”. Eventually, yes. Or a few bags of groceries. Or a half-dozen burgers and fries from Shake Shack. In fact, the next time you place an order on Postmates, there’s a chance that a robot and his friendly handler might appear at your door.
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About

Maura Judkis

Maura Judkis is a reporter for the Washington Post, covering culture, food and the arts. Her work has been honored by the Association of Food Journalists and the Virginia Press Association. Maura has appeared on local and international TV and radio, including MSNBC, CNN, PBS, and Al Jazeera. She is a 2007 graduate of the George Washington University, and a 2011 arts journalism fellow with the National Endowment for the Arts and the University of Southern California. She has also written for U.S. News & World Report, TBD.com, ARTnews, the Washington City Paper, and the Onion A.V. Club.