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Maura Judkis

Reporter, The Washington Post

Washington, D.C.

Maura Judkis

Maura Judkis is a reporter for the Washington Post, covering culture, food and the arts. She is a 2018 James Beard Award winner whose work has been recognized by the Association of Food Journalists and the Virginia Press Association. Maura has appeared on MSNBC, CNN, PBS, NPR and Al Jazeera. She is a 2007 graduate of the George Washington University, and a 2011 arts journalism fellow with the National Endowment for the Arts and the University of Southern California.

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Two words will tell you everything about Thanksgiving novelty snacks: Gravy candy

For a holiday that is centered around food, Thanksgiving doesn’t command the kind of weird novelty snacks we see for Halloween and Christmas. There is no real Thanksgiving candy, no Thanksgiving Starbucks Frappuccino (the pumpkin spice latte, which belongs to the entire season of autumn, does not count).
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Love it or hate it, there are more varieties of candy corn than ever this Halloween

The thing that is hard to grasp about candy corn-flavored candy — not candy corn, but other candy that tastes like it — is that it’s a candy more defined by its texture than its flavor. What is “candy corn flavor,” other than slightly caramelized sugar? Isn’t candy corn-flavored candy just . . . sugar-flavored sugar?
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How does Heinz’s Mayochup stack up against other mayo-ketchup sauces?

Controversies surrounding condiments tend to be about what we put them on, not what they are. Never ketchup on a hot dog if you’re from Chicago. Never mayonnaise on a pastrami sandwich if you’re from just about anywhere. But for Mayochup, the new condiment from Heinz that made its American debut last month, there’s no disagreement over what it goes well with — burgers and fries.
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Edible birthday candles are here because some people got tired of eating wax on their cake

Getting wax on your birthday cake is, for sure, the very definition of a First World Problem. It’s one that falls somewhere in between “My hair is too shiny” and “The hotel towels aren’t soft enough.”. But it’s a problem with a solution: What if, instead of wax, birthday candles were made of chocolate?
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These ‘eggs’ are made from mung beans. Could they pass for the real thing?

It’s called Just Egg, and the company wants consumers to think it tastes just like one — even performing taste tests in a promotional company video in which surprised people ask, “Are you kidding? It’s not egg?”. Nope, it’s not. The scrambled-egg substitute is made from the mung bean, a legume cultivated in Asia.
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Pringles could never have captured Nashville’s hot chicken in a chip

Nashville hot chicken went from an African American regional delicacy to a national phenomenon in about a decade. The style of extra-spicy fried chicken served with pickles and some bread to mop up the sauce is credited to Prince’s Chicken Shack, a restaurant that earned a James Beard America’s Classics award for its innovation.
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The cereal of the future misses the point of Dippin’ Dots

It was supposed to be the “ice cream of the future,” but that was when Dippin’ Dots was founded, in 1988. Of course, they never said how far into the future we’d have to go before everyone would be eating cryogenically frozen globes of ice cream in our spacesuits. Well, the future has come to pass, and we’re still fine with basic Ben & Jerry’s, thank you very much.
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Camel milk is full of nutrients and it’s growing in popularity. But how does it taste?

Every time you go to the grocery store, it seems like there’s a new type of milk. These milks come from animals, or vegetables or nuts. There’s oat milk, macadamia milk, hemp milk and pea milk. There’s goat milk, and there’s even cockroach milk — not commercially available yet, which must be a relief for the squeamish.
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I drank Capriccio sangria, the potent ‘it’ drink of summer, and survived with dignity intact

I drank some Capriccio sangria and I did not black out, or get pregnant, or wake up on my kitchen floor with a chicken tender in my hand — all things that fans and foes of the drink have alleged are within its mysterious powers. I didn’t text any exes or embarrass myself, thank goodness. I did not start any fights.
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This new Oreo flavor smells like floor cleaner

Controversy has befouled a national contest to create a new Oreo flavor: One Colorado woman says she came up with the company’s new cherry cola flavor but has not been given proper credit. Taylor Young says Oreo sent her a box of her proposed cherry cola Oreos thanking her for her contest entry, which comes with the chance to win $500,000, but she told a local news station that the company has since claimed “that cherry cola was already in development, so it was not her idea.”.
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Elderflower soda and lavender lattes: Flowers are suddenly everywhere in food

Go to any women’s clothing store and you’ll notice: Floral prints are having a moment right now. Shirts and skirts and dresses — and even men’s clothing — are festooned with flowers, in prints that are a throwback to the ‘60s or ‘90s. In the words of “The Devil Wears Prada’s” icy editor in chief Miranda Priestly: “Florals?
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Craft breweries roll out their dankest beers for 4/20

April 20 is a day to toast and get toasted, if you work for a brewery. which is known as 420, the high holiday for marijuana users — with pot-punny beer names, especially for IPAs. You see, cannabis and hops are relatives, and both get their flavors and aromas from compounds called terpenes. That’s why brewers like to describe super-hoppy IPAs the way that they might talk about marijuana: “dank,” “resinous,” “sticky.”.
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About

Maura Judkis

Maura Judkis is a reporter for the Washington Post, covering culture, food and the arts. She is a 2018 James Beard Award winner whose work has been honored by the Association of Food Journalists and the Virginia Press Association. Maura has appeared on local and international TV and radio, including MSNBC, CNN, PBS, and Al Jazeera. She is a 2007 graduate of the George Washington University, and a 2011 arts journalism fellow with the National Endowment for the Arts and the University of Southern California. She has also written for U.S. News & World Report, TBD.com, ARTnews, the Washington City Paper, and the Onion A.V. Club.